The mind of your dog

Dr. Colgan breaks down how neurotransmitters your dog’s brain work. He goes into how to boost its energy, improve memory, improve behaviour, and reduce anxiety.

Canine thoughts and emotions

Your dog feels anger, anxiety, fear, sadness, and sorrow. Learn how neurotransmission works. And learn how to regulate negative emotions through nutrition and supplementation.

Anti-oxidants and inflammation

As dogs age, free radicals accumulate in their brain causing oxidative stress. This stress promotes chronic damage to their brain. Learn how to improve and extend your dog’s peak cognition.

Brain nutrition and your dog

What is Neurogenesis? Neuroplasticity? Learn how nutrition and supplements can greatly improve your dog’s brain health and recovery.

Canine energy

Where does your dog get its energy? Find out from Dr. Colgan what the key components are in canine brain function and how the special formulation of Alpha Dog’s flagship product ON! can help.

Your dog’s muscles and bones

Dr Colgan describes Alpha Dog’s next two products: BRAWN! and THRIVE! designed specifically to improve your dog’s bones, muscles, and joints. You will learn how each ingredient activates natural processes in your dog to help it maintain and extend its good health.

Teaching your new pup not to nip

Under the control of their genes, pups grow 28 temporary teeth within three weeks of birth. The same genes direct them to chew and nip constantly to prepare the gums for their 42 adult teeth. These start to replace puppy teeth at about 3 months, and are all grown by about six months.

Agility: Canine Game of Life

Agility is the ultimate game for dogs and the most fun canine sport for spectators. During competition, the dog demonstrates its agile nature, its versatility, and its training by following cues from the owner that direct it through a complex timed obstacle course of jumps, tunnels, balancing walks, weave poles, and other objects.

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Where Did Your Dog Come From?

The oldest dog remains, called the Altai dog” are dated at 33,000 years ago. They were found in Razboinichya Cave in Siberia (2). About the same time, dogs were becoming a separate species from their grey wolf ancestors all across Europe. Domesticated by Paleolithic hunter-gatherers in many places during the same period, dogs started to be bred for hunting and guarding while we humans still lived in caves.  

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How well does your dog smell?

Much dog selection for scent training is based on tradition. There is no standard method to measure canine olfactory capacity, and most efforts to do it have been very poor. Labradors, German Shepherds, Beagles and many other breeds are adopted for scent training without any idea of their power of their sniffers.

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How your dog sees color

Recent molecular research shows that up to 20% of canine retinas are seeded with two types of color cones, which enable dogs to see many shades of yellow, and shades of blue to purple. Humans have three types of color cones which allow us to also see the reds and greens. The color spectrum below compares us with dogs.

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Dog breeds for the first time owner

Judging from the massive numbers of dogs who end up in rescue facilities, often rejected because they were deemed unsuitable, choosing your first family dog is very difficult.  It’s usually a one-time choice, with zero experience of the pup, based on looks and hearsay. We put selecting your pet up there with selecting your spouse. At least we get the chance to try them out first.

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The mind of a dog, part 2

New research shows that brains of successful service dogs respond differently to those of other dogs. In a controlled trial on 43 Labradors and Golden Retriever crosses, they have found that pups with the right brain patterns are more likely to be successful in service training.

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Protect Your Dog from Cancer

Most dog breeds are very recent. They were created during the 18th and 19th century for hunting, guarding, and companionship, with little knowledge that the consequences of altering a dog’s physical characteristics also alter its health, lifespan, and risk of various diseases. One unfortunate effect of breeding practices is to increase canine risk of various types of cancer.

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Brain nutrients improve cognition in dogs

Over the last decade, the science of brain function has changed utterly. The obsolete molar approaches of the 20th century, still evident in the media, have been totally replaced by the astonishing new molecular science of DNA, RNA, and gene function, and processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, and epigenesis.

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Teaching your new pup not to nip

Under the control of their genes, pups grow 28 temporary teeth within three weeks of birth. The same genes direct them to chew and nip constantly to prepare the gums for their 42 adult teeth. These start to replace puppy teeth at about 3 months, and are all grown by about six months.

read more
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